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Steve Riach: The Power of One

December 3, 2019

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Steve Riach: The Power of One

December 3, 2019

Carly sits with Steve Riach of The One Heart Project, a non-profit that seeks to deter juvenile crime and recidivism rates for those who have been incarcerated by addressing children pre-crime at school initiatives; and post-incarceration for reentry into society to become thriving members of it. They discuss how Steve recognized the problem, how he began to address it one person at a time, and the One Heart movie inspired by real life events. They discuss the power of community collaboration and emotional intelligence education to change the trajectory of young lives and solve problems within that community.


 
 

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Carly Fiorina:
I'm Carly Fiorina and this is By Example. This year about four million children will enter kindergarten in the US. They'll be learning their sight words, coloring photos for their parents' fridge and playing out at recess with new friends. In less than a decade, about four million children will also have cycled through detention centers in the US. Each year, a half a million children are brought to the juvenile courts and adult criminal justice system. The percentage of bright young people who are going to get a full ride scholarship to college is about the same percentage of those who are going to be incarcerated in our jails and prisons. One group's potential on the verge of being explored. The others cut off. Our next guest felt compelled to tell the stories of juvenile incarceration. He allowed the real human impact of our criminal justice system to come to life through his movie. Steve Riach is an award winning producer and director. His work has been recognized for its transformative impact on our nations incarcerated and at risk youth. He is the co-founder of the One Heart Project, a program he felt compelled to create, which you're going to hear more about in this episode. I was eager to sit down with Steve and discuss how his creative success became a platform to address a nationwide problem. I felt inspired after our talk, and I think you will to. Have a listen. I hope you enjoy the conversation with Steve Riach. Steve Riach of The One Heart Project. I want to welcome you to By Example. I am very excited that you're sitting here in our studios, and we're going to have this conversation. And I'm very excited because of course, you're celebrated producer and director, but I'm most excited actually because your life's work is a reflection of two things that I've learned in my life. The first is that everyone has potential, usually more than they realize, but that so many people's potential never gets unlocked or it gets overlooked because of their circumstances, or their parents or their misfortunes. And the second principle is that people close to a problem can figure out how to solve it. So I want to start by asking you, what's the group of people that you realized had so much potential and it was getting overlooked? Tell us about that population, and tell us about how you came to have a heart for that problem.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangI appreciate you having me here, and I appreciate you asking. Carly, it's an honor to be with you. That group is justice involved youth or youth in the juvenile justice system. And you're absolutely correct. These are individuals who have potential. They've got a purpose. They were born with a purpose. And because of experiences growing up, because the households they grew up in, the environments they were raised in, they made bad choices, and those bad choices have sidetracked their lives, and most of those young people feel like there's absolutely no hope for them now. They think their life now is destined for continuing on the way they are. They're destined to be lifelong criminals. Even if they get out, nobody will ever hire them. They'll never be able to go back to school. They've got no hope for the future. And like you, I just believe that that's not true. I believe they do have a destiny they can fulfill and there will be opportunities for them.

Carly Fiorina:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangIt's so interesting that you use the phrase "purpose" because I believe each of us are created on purpose for a purpose. But so many of us get sidetracked by the wrong choices or the wrong circumstances. And these juveniles that you have taken into your heart and into your life's work, these juveniles, I was reading some of the really tragic statistics about them. How many juveniles are in our criminal justice system? How many of them come from homes where they've been abused or neglected? How many of them have no fathers? How many of them have just been surrounded by not just wrong choices but self-destructive choices all of their lives?

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangYeah, that's true. There are more than a million kids that get arrested every year in the United States. It's a mind boggling number. And around the country in different juvenile facilities, correctional facilities, there are at least a hundred thousand kids in those facilities today. In my state, in my home state, the state of Texas, on a given day, there are 75,000 plus youth who are in the system on a given day. So it's a massive number, and it's a significant problem in our culture. And they do come from unimaginable circumstances as we said. 90% come from single parent homes, 60 plus percent come from living at or below the poverty line. The self reported victimization of abuse in their own home is exceed 60%. The majority of them family members who are in prison. So really they've been born into an environment mostly where this is a pathway that they tend to follow from others that they've seen. When you ask these kids, "What did you see in your neighborhood in terms of opportunities that existed for you?" Really the only thing they saw were drug dealers and people who were making a living by robbing or stealing. And so, when they feel like there was no other avenue for them, it becomes really a survival game for them. How am I going to survive? And so you asked me about how I got a heart for this, and we have a long history, a nonprofit that has a long history of working with underserved youth around the United States for the last 20 plus years. But we really weren't focusing on those that were in the juvenile justice system until about 10 years ago. And I happened to meet a young man while we were doing some research for the movie that we're producing. And this young man while I was interviewing him during a break in the interview, we had to shut down camera to change batteries. And this young man's name was Marc. And Marc said, during that break, he said, "By the way, I'm being released to go home tomorrow." And I said, "Congratulations. You must be very excited." He said, "No, sir, I'm terrified." I said, "Really? Tell me why?" And he began to tell me his story, Carly, "And nine years old, I was raising myself and my younger sister, my mom and my dad weren't there. I witnessed my first murder when I was 12. I was in and out of different foster homes, abused in some of them, and so decided I'd go on my own. Go on my own on the streets. I was living in abandoned cars, trying to fend for myself when I'm 15 years old," he told me. He said, "I got arrested. I robbed these two people. I know what I did was wrong, but I didn't know how else I was going to eat." And so he ended up serving three years in the state facility, juvenile facility. And he said, "I'm 19 now. I've got two felony convictions. Nobody will hire me. I'm too old to go back to school. Well, I used to be a blood. There's no telling what they'll do when they find out I'm out. So if you ask me if I'm excited to go home, sir tomorrow, no sir, I'm not." And it just really exposed to me the breadth of issues that these young people face, and no one should have that experience where they walk away from making wrong choices and feel like there's no hope for them. There's always hope. So we felt like we could do something about it.

Carly Fiorina:
It's such a incredibly moving story, and some people would hear that story, and be moved, and feel badly, and move on, but you on the other hand experienced that problem by way of him describing all of his problems, and you decided, I'm going to do something about this. I can do something about that. Why? Because not everybody reacts that way. Why do you think you reacted that way?

Steve Riach:
I just feel like we're responsible with the information that we receive always. We receive information. We're responsible for doing something with that information. And when that young man told me his story, I did feel, I felt like I could do something to help him. I don't think, I thought at the time that we could help a whole bunch of kids in the juvenile system, but I felt like we could do something to help him. I think there was a moment where I felt like there was some divine providence as well. No question. I felt like my proverbial collar had been grabbed and I had this moment of truth, which was, what are you going to do about this young man? Are you going to pat him on the back and wish him a nice life or you're going to do something else? And so I knew we could do something to help him. That began the journey of trying to see if a network of people, a community of people could come around this young man and provide resources and services and family and life for him. What would happen to him? And it was so dramatic. And there were so many people that wanted to get involved and help him. And then Marc became the Pied Piper, if you will. He kept telling us stories about all these other youth that had had similar experiences and if they were given a chance, they really could make it. And so organically a group of people came together and decided they would help the next one and the next one and the next one, and that's really how the One Heart Project was born.

Carly Fiorina:
So I want to unpack what you just said for a moment because I said at the outset of our conversation that I was so excited to talk to you because you exemplify in your work, so many of the things that I've learned and that I teach in problem solving and leadership, and one of the things that I say to young people for example all the time is find your problem to solve. It's one thing to talk about problems in the abstract, world hunger, juvenile incarceration. It's another thing to tackle the problem right in front of you. Let me feed this homeless person. Let me help this one youth. Your problem to solve initially was Marc, but Marc led you to all these other bigger, more impactful solutions because you saw more and more of the problem, and as you got closer to more and more Marcs, you understood better and better how to solve things for them. It's what I meant when I said at the outset, people closest to the problem, know best how to solve it, but we have to pick the right problem. Your problem was Marc to start with.

Steve Riach:
Yeah. Yeah, you're right.

Carly Fiorina:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangAnd it just led to all these other places. It's why I say the essence of leadership isn't title. It's problem solving.

Steve Riach:
Yeah, you're absolutely right. And I think there are problems outside everyone's door, individuals who need help. And there's an opportunity for us to be a problem solver that always leads to something greater and bigger. Should we choose to follow that? I was going to produce a movie. I really, that's all I was going to do. And in meeting Marc I was getting the background information to be able to have the screenplay written and tell the story. I really thought that this movie would be something very powerful in terms of changing the narrative of what people think these kids are like. I think the general public looks at kids who are incarcerated and they tend to think these are bad kids, are getting what they deserve and I'm glad they don't live in my neighborhood or date my daughter. And so, the hope was that the movie would change the narrative and create a sense of compassion for the general public for these youth and create awareness, but I don't think at the very outset that there was ever a thought that it would lead to the One Heart Project. Even though we had been working for 10 years on the nonprofit side with underserved youth. I wasn't smart enough to make the connection. But in meeting Mark and hearing the story, it was obvious that we could solve that problem. And as you said, then understanding the problem, and the breadth of it created an opportunity for us. And I think myself and those who are part of this got very excited about the opportunity. Once we saw the problem or the statistic was not our focus, our focus was the skin and bones of Mark who was a real human being with real needs that we could help right there. And I think in the process of developing the movie, as we started to understand more about the opportunities that we had to use the movie as a vehicle, we started to have contact with a number of organizations that had been associated with movies over the past 10 years or so. The focus has typically been on advocacy. And advocacy is important for juvenile justice, no question. But we just felt like there was something more than that, that we needed to be hands on helping these young people first. And if we really could help them and start seeing lives transformed, then we had a right to call for advocacy. And not only do we have a right to call for advocacy, but we had the stories and the data and all that to see what that looked like in order to make success.

Carly Fiorina:
So I want to talk about the project in more detail in a moment. But first if we might, can you just tell us a little bit about the movie, the sneak preview story of the movie because it's so powerful, the story.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số Haojiang2008 there was a high school football game that took place in Texas, Grapevine, Texas between a private school, Grapevine Faith and a team from a maximum security facility called the Gainesville State School, which is just below the Texas, Oklahoma border. And that school is a maximum security facility. As I said, the kids that are placed there, if they're achieving in the classroom and with their behavior marks and all that, at about a 70% to 80% level, they have the privilege of playing football. And for them it's three hours to be out in the free world. It makes them feel like a kid again, a normal kid again. But when they play, typically, they play against teams who don't have understanding about what their circumstances are like. All they know is that they're kids from a juvenile justice facility. So they're treated typically like criminals. They usually get beaten every time they play. And so, this one night, the coach Chris Hogan, an amazing man from Grapevine Faith decided this was an opportunity for us to show these kids that they're just as important as anybody else on the face of the earth, and show them that they're deserving of a second chance. And we want to be an example of unconditional love to them. And so we rallied the community around them. They came out and formed a spirit line for these kids to run through on a banner to crash through. These kids never have a home game. They never have fans in the stands. And so, that community of Grapevine Faith became their fans that night. They sat in the stands on their side. They cheered for them against their own children. It was a very, very special display of unconditional love that had a profound impact on those youth at night, and really on everybody that was there. We decided to take that special event and the stories that went behind it and turn it into a major motion picture. So if you think of the blind side or remember the Titans or some of the great inspirational football films, or films that have a football landscape, that's what One Heart is. It uses football as the landscape to tell this really special story of this population of youth, and our main character who are in the juvenile justice system, and how he navigates his way through all of the pitfalls and the trials from his past. And this special magical night provides the boost for him to really see transformation and a new life.

Carly Fiorina:
I have seen the trailer for this movie. I can't wait for the actual movie to come out. It is an amazing story just to hear you describe the story, chokes me up again. And it's yet another reminder. So often people feel in circumstances that are so much better than the circumstances that these juveniles face, but I meet people all the time who feel helpless and powerless and frustrated, and there's nothing I can do to make a difference. And just that evening, the simple act of cheering on another side of the field, and showing a bunch of kids love and acceptance was an incredibly powerful act.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangIt was. And I think for those kids, the greatest thing I did was it provided hope.

Carly Fiorina:
Yes, of course. That-

Steve Riach:
So many of us live without hope. Like-

Carly Fiorina:
Yes.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangSo many people live without hope.

Carly Fiorina:
Yes. We feel hopeless and helpless and powerless and frustrated, and yet there is so much that we can do. And so, now going onto your project, so you meet Mark and you realize I can not only help him, but as time goes on, you realize I can help so many more Marc. Tell us, you're in five states today, you're moving towards 10, tell us a little bit about the fantastic work of your project.

Steve Riach:
Yeah, what we did at the very beginning was we wanted to do research. We wanted to find out what's the circumstance with juveniles in the prison system around the country. And so we actually spent several months talking with juvenile justice leaders in every state who work out of the governor's office in each state. And well, I think the most disheartening thing we found right out of the shoot Carly, was when we asked for data of the different states on the youth that they serve in the juvenile justice system. It was 44 states that didn't have data. And so you think about these kids and how invisible they are in our population, and to a great degree, we don't know a lot about them. But what we did find through all of our research was that most efforts that are being directed towards these kids are fragmented. There are a number of service providers and nonprofits and community organizations, but there's very little collaboration. It sounds like the political system. There's very little collaboration. And so what we felt like was there was an opportunity for us to create a framework that would allow for a youth to access every skill and tool necessary to navigate life, and be surrounded by a network of healthy relationships. And if we could do that, if we could provide every tool out there that was necessary, plus those healthy relationships, then they really had a chance to succeed and thrive. And so we built that framework. We ran pilots in Texas and in New York at Rikers Island in New York. And the data came back very, very strong. The recidivism rates, which are in excess of 70% all around the country since that time for us, have dropped to about 18%. So we're seeing dramatic results. And it's really a result of this collaboration with a number of different organizations that have come together and provided that holistic opportunity, to provide all those tools and skills. And it is creating a difference. So we're in Texas and Utah, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, and there are a number of states that we'll be expanding to this year, Nebraska, Oklahoma, a number of others. And very, very thankful for the opportunity

Carly Fiorina:
And the literally thousands and thousands and thousands of lives that you've changed completely.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangWell, there's a bunch of great people who have come alongside these kids and lives are being changed because of the wonderful people that have come alongside. And so, we've got corporate leaders and NFL teams, and business owners and moms, and just a whole army of people that have come around these kids. And that really is what it takes to see these lives transformed. And there's so much opportunity. And what we know is that as we look at, for example, the workforce development issue that we're facing in our country, we know we see the unemployment numbers and they're really good, but we also know that over the next 10 years, there'll be two and a half million jobs in the manufacturing industry that'll be open. We know the construction industry has, in some cities that we're working in has many as 200,000 workers short. So this is a win-win because it's an opportunity for us to see these individual lives transform, but it's also an opportunity for these young people who are 17, 18, 19 years old who desperately need a job when they get released from prison, to be part of the solution, the workforce solution that we face. And then you think about the effect of that is we've got more citizens who are benefiting their communities. They're paying taxes. The crime rate goes down. The effect of this over a generation is profound. If we can continue to see the successes we're seeing.

Carly Fiorina:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangLike so many great leaders in the beginning of the answer you just gave, you gave all the credit to everyone else. All the wonderful people you collaborate with. And obviously, every single person engaged in this is making a huge difference. And yet, none of it would've happened without the catalyst of leadership. In this case, your leadership. This podcast is called By Example, and it's called By Example because I want our listeners to learn leadership through an example of leadership, so that we remember that somebody could have a big title, somebody could have a big office, somebody could have a big position, but that isn't what makes them a leader. So I want to unpack for a little bit your leadership because if the purpose of a leader is to solve a problem, and I believe it is, leadership is always the catalyst to getting the problem actually solved. For something actually to happen instead of people just to walk away and go, "Yep, terrible, not my problem." For me, there are four essential qualities of leadership. A leader focuses their purpose on problem solving, their problem to solve. You started with Marc. It takes courage because a lot of people tell you, "You're crazy perhaps." It takes character because the going gets tough, and there are setbacks and disappointments, as well as trials. It takes collaboration with a lot of other people, which requires some humility, as well as empathy. And it takes the ability to see possibilities. To see not just possibilities in other people, but possibilities that things can get better. And so if I may, I want to talk a little bit about each of those characteristics because you have them all, and they all were necessary ingredients for your leadership. Your ability to catalyze Marc into an incredible project and program. So first, courage, there had to be people when you started this. There had to be people who said, "What are you doing? This is crazy. They're just bad kids. You've got other things to do." There had to be people who were not just skeptical, but were critical. And that takes courage sometimes to overcome. The same courage that it takes Mark to set aside his bad choices, and have the courage to make different choices.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangYeah, I think to me everything starts with vision. And when you really feel like you have been given a vision, then I think it's much easier to stand against or stand up in the face of opposition or criticism. I think there certainly are going to be people who are critical, who will give you tons of reasons why something can't be done. I remember reading a book many years ago by Steve Sample called the Contrarian Leader, and he talked about how he brought his board while he was the president at the University of Southern California. He brought his board together, and got them to think about instead of why it can't be done, why can it be done? And we spent so much time, I think saying why things can't get done, that we tend to miss out on seeing all those reasons why they can. To me, as I said, it starts with vision. And if the vision's, it gives you... it's certainly given me the courage to stand. And the other thing is it's not false humility, but there's so many people who come around you that help breathe life into that vision. And I think, I get encouraged by them as well. I think, the courage comes when you've got other people standing with you. And I think one of the mistakes that leaders make is they feel like they have to stand alone. Those are rare moments when we stand alone. We do once in a while have to stand alone. But I think most of the time there's at least somebody who's with us. And it's important for us to recognize that. And they're breathing life and hope, and encouragement, and courage into us. And I've certainly had that. I've been very, very blessed by that.

Carly Fiorina:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangIt's so true. One of the things that I say to young people all the time is there are two kinds of people you're going to have in your life. Those who lift you up and those who tear you down. Spend your time with those who lift you up. And we all have those people, but sometimes we get fixated on the people who are trying to tear us down. It's also true. You talked about vision. What you gave Marc. What you give all the young people that you're working with, you and the folks you collaborate with. What you're giving them as a vision of a different life. A vision of a different future. You're giving them a vision of hope. That's what the cheering on the other side of the football field was about. It was a vision of hope and love and a future. And it does take, I'm sure for all the Marcs out there, it takes those people who lift them up. It takes that vision of a different future, to sometimes be courageous enough to say to all the bad guys, trying to hold them back and say, "No, no, no, no. You got to stick with this life." It takes courage to say, "No, I'm going to redirect my life and make better choices."

Steve Riach:
Definitely. That's takes courage to do the right thing. I think, in our culture we see that today. It takes great courage to do the right thing, not just say the right thing, but do the right thing. And so for Mark, and all those other young men and women that came after him, we have all been so thrilled by their courage that they've demonstrated to not go back to the life that they had. And then interesting side note on that is that, it's hard for someone like Marc who's lived in the circumstances that he has to be in a circumstance that he's in now. Even though we think, "Oh man, this must have been the great path for him." Once you get to the place where you've got all these people helping you, it creates a whole different set of issues, because now I don't want to let anybody down. I don't want to fail people. And so that takes courage too, to continue on and stick it all the way through to the end. Stick with it all the way through to the end, so that I leave behind my fear of letting people down. And we've seen these young men and women do that. They've overcome so much fear, and so many things that would hold them back. And we have to be courageous in the environment that we're in today. As you know, you have exhibited great courage in all that you've done. And so it's vital for us today to stand. I think, one of my favorite quotes is, "The only thing that's necessary for evil to win in the world is for enough good men, good people to do nothing." Right?

Carly Fiorina:
[crosstalk 00:31:14].

Steve Riach:
We have to stand up and be courageous and do something.

Carly Fiorina:
Yes. Do some something.

Steve Riach:
Just do something.

Carly Fiorina:
Not talk, do.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangYeah. Just do something.

Carly Fiorina:
Talk is good, but do something. Find your problem to solve. We use the word character, and I think characters incredibly important. We don't lift it up in our popular culture. We lift up other things, controversy and conflict and outrage and the latest YouTube video sensation, whatever, which usually doesn't have much to do with character. And yet, character is essential for when those times get tough. One of the aspects of what you are trying to instill in these young people is character development. Talk just a little bit about that because that is also a place where your work in mind intersect a lot, and I'm so encouraged that character development is such a core part of your program for these young kids.

Steve Riach:
Yeah, so really 20 years ago when we launched our nonprofit are the passion that I had, and those that shared it with me when we launched it was to instill character in the youth of our nation. And so now being able to do that with kids who are in the juvenile system is just such a thrill. I'll tell you a quick story. When we ran the pilot initiative for One Heart at Rikers Island, fascinating experience. So we really only ran two elements of what the current initiative is, and that was this intensive social and emotional intelligence curricular learning. And then we matched that with a one-on-one adult mentor relationship. Since then, we've built out the other elements of the initiative, but those are the only two things we ran with this group of youth at Rikers Island. Now Rikers at the time, 700 kids in that facility, maximum security facility. I walked in there, very combustible environment was one of the few times I've actually been in a correctional facility where I was a little concerned. And was counting the number of security officers around the room with those 700 kids, but very, very combustible. And the warden was just a beautiful man who really wanted to see change take place in those kids. And so we had been running the initiative there for about five months. And he called me one day and he said, "You have to see what's going on here." And I said, "Well, tell me." And he said, "Well, we have the leader of the most notorious teen gang in the state of New York, in our facility, and yesterday he surrendered his colors. He quit the gang." And I said, "Huh, that's amazing." And he said, "Yeah, it's amazing. But he's risking his life to do that." He actually called me the next day and said that that young man had been beaten badly...

Carly Fiorina:
Oh damn.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangBecause you don't leave once you're in.

Carly Fiorina:
Yeah, you don't leave.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangAnd while he was in the infirmary, the warden came to him and to check on him and see if he's okay. And the young man said, "I don't care what they do to me. I'm never going back." So I hopped on a plane and flew to New York. And I asked him if I could be a fly on the wall in the back of the room when he gathered some of the young men that we'd been working with. And when I walked in the room, Carly, these teenagers were posing. They're leaning back in their chairs, their arms are folded. They want to do nothing more than looking soft in that environment. And so they're looking hard and tough. And the administrator who's in the front of the room is asking them about the initiative. "And you've been going through this now for five months. If you've enjoyed going through this and you feel like it's impacted your life, I'd like you to demonstrate that by a show of hands." And I can't tell you the thought that came over me was, "A show of hands." These kids don't want to look soft at all. And so all of a sudden, all these hands went up, and I was very moved. Every young person in the room had raised their hand. And so I asked the warden, I said, "Can I talk to some of these kids afterwards?" And so he put one in one corner of the room, and one in another and one in another, and I walked up to the first young man, introduced myself and asked him what's his name and why are you here and how old are you? And then I said, "You raised your hand, why'd you raise your hand?" And he said, "You know those things that we learned in the program or we learning in the program?" And I said, "Like what?" And he said, "Well, like responsibility and compassion and integrity." I said, "Yes." He said, "I've never heard those words before." I said, "You're just telling me you didn't know what they meant?" And he said, "No sir, I've never heard those words before." And I asked him, "Were you born and raised in the United States?" He said, "Yes, right here in New York City." I said, "You're telling me," he was 19 years old. I said, "You've never heard those words before?" "No sir. But now that I've heard him and I know what they mean, and now I see I can live those out. I'm committed. I'm going to live that way for the rest of my life. I'm never going back." So I went to the next young man. "What's your name? Why are you here? How old are you?" "18 years old." I said, "You raised your hand. Why'd you raise your hand?" He said, "You know those things we learned about in the curriculum?" And I said, "Like what?" He said, "Well, like respect and compassion." I said, "Yes." He said, "I never knew what those words meant." And I asked him, I said, "Have you heard the words before?" He said, "Yes, but I never knew what they meant." And he said, "But now I know what they mean and I've seen other people that can live that way. I'm going to live that way. I'm never going back." Then I went to the third young man, same questions, and I asked him why he raised his hand. He said, "You know those things we learned about in the curriculum? Like commitment and leadership, teamwork?" I said, "Yes." He said, "I've never seen anybody in my life who's ever lived those things out. But now that I've seen somebody who's lived them out, I know that I can do that too. I'm never going back." So within a matter of a few minutes I'd been given, never heard the words, never knew what they meant, never had a model. And I think about, it's not just kids in prison, but it's the culture that we live in today who has become character illiterate. We know what they mean. We don't know what those principles mean. And we don't see them live out in front of us. And so if we don't know what they mean, we aren't taught them and we don't see them lived out in front of us. How will we ever embrace them? And so now what you know is that we have this generation of youth that is now in the workforce, and their greatest fear according to the data that has just come out, the greatest fear they have in the workforce is that they don't have the character or values to be able to navigate what they're going to be faced with in the workforce. We've raised that generation of character illiterates who are now in positions where what they do really matters, and we have a lot of work to do to help them catch up, and they recognize it.

Carly Fiorina:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangWell, and I very much hope that we can do a lot of that work together, but it's so important what you just said. It's one of the reasons I wrote the book. It's one of the reasons that I do the work I do here at the Unlocking Potential Foundation. It's not just that people don't know. They haven't heard the words. They don't hear them in social media for sure, or they don't know what the words mean, or they don't see people living out those words. All those things are true. But even worse, I think, the people who are given the title of leader do the opposite. So whether it is cultural leaders or icons or business leaders or faith leaders or political leaders, there's so many examples where people say, "Yeah, but that person has all the trappings of leadership and they're not doing that." And so it's a double whammy all the way back to the beginning. One of the reasons that I am so pleased that you were able to join us here for by example, one of the reasons I'm looking forward to future collaboration, one of the reasons I'm so privileged that our lives and our work have intersected is because I think you like, I believe we have to reintroduce some things. We defined some things. I think we have to redefine leadership for people. We're all capable of it. I think we have to reintroduce courage and character and humility and empathy, and imagination and integrity, respect. We have to reintroduce those things. And it's not just incarcerated youth to whom we need to reintroduce them. Although, that's a great place to start.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangIt's a great place to start, but you're absolutely correct. We've lost our way in many ways as a culture. And incarcerated youth are one segment of the population that we have an opportunity to see real transformation. And I think part of it is because they truly want that. They really truly want that. But I think what we're finding is that there are many more people in our country who also want that or who are coming to an understanding of what they're missing.

Carly Fiorina:
I certainly see that in the communities where we work. People know we're missing something now. And so it makes people more likely, I think, if given the right circumstances, the right leadership, the right catalyst to step to the plate.

Steve Riach:
Absolutely. I think about what's happening in corporate America, where as you said, from a leadership standpoint, we may not be seeing what we want to see. But we've got this generation of Millennials and Gen Z years who are coming in, and they're really in a way almost demanding that there's something more. And they don't even necessarily know exactly, they can't quite put their finger on what they're missing, but they know they want social responsibility. They know they want to be hands on and be actively involved in creating change. They know that there's something not right with where we're at. And so that gives me great hope because I think if they can taste and see what real leadership is, I think that bodes very well for the future of our nation and movements like this One Heart Project, where I need to be passing this off to people. And I'm really excited about people that are coming up behind us who, I think, will carry the torch really well once they gain understanding of what true leadership really is.

Carly Fiorina:
Everyone has more potential than they realize. All of us are capable of leadership. We each are created on purpose for a purpose. And our purpose, among other things is to solve the problem we're meant to solve. Steve, thank you so much for joining me on By Example.

Steve Riach:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangThank you, Carly. My pleasure.

Carly Fiorina:
Kết quả xổ số HaojiangThat's all for now. If you enjoyed this podcast, you can visit carlyfiorina.com or iTunes for more episodes. And make sure you subscribe to By Example, so you never miss an episode. To receive updates and exclusive offers, text By Example to 345345. And while you're at it, you can send us feedback on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram @carlyfiorina or by email at byexample@carlyfiorina.com. As always, thanks so much for tuning in. I'm Carly Fiorina and this is By Example.